• Home   /  
  • Archive by category "1"

Cover Letter Glossary Of Literary

See also: Glossary of poetry terms, Literary criticism, Literary theory, and Index of literature articles

The following is a list of literary terms; that is, those words used in discussion, classification, criticism, and analysis of poetry, novels, and picture books.

TermDescriptionCitationCategoryNotes
Abecedariusan acrostic in which the first letter of every word, strophe or verse follows the order of the alphabet[1]
Acatalectic
AccentNoun used to describe the stress put on a certain syllable while speaking a word. Ex.- In Coleridge’s “Kubla Khan,” there has been much controversy over the pronunciation of “Abora” in line 41. According to Herbert Tucker of the website For Better For Verse, the accent is on the first and last syllable of the word, making its pronunciation: AborA.[2][3]
Accentual verseAccentual verse is common in children's poetry; nursery rhymes and the less well-known skipping-rope rhymes are the most common form of accentual verse in the English Language.[4]
AcrosticAn acrostic is a poem or other form of writing in which the first letter, syllable or word of each line, paragraph or other recurring feature in the text spells out a word or a message. An Acrostic By Edgar Allan Poe.[5]
Act
Adjectivea word or phrase which modifies a noun or pronoun, grammatically added to describe, identify, or quantify the related noun or pronoun.[6][7]
AdverbA describing word used to modify a verb, adjective, or another adverb. Typically ending in -ly, adverbs answer the questions when, how, and how many times.[2][8]
Aisling
AllegoryA specific type of writing in which the settings, characters, and events stand for other specific people, events, or ideas.[9]
AlliterationRepetition of the initial sounds of words, as in “Peter Piper picked a peck of pickled peppers”[10]
AllusionA figure of speech that makes a reference to, or representation of, people, places, events, literary work, myths, or works of art, either directly or by implication.[10]
AnachronismErroneous use of an object, event, idea, or word that does not belong to that time period.[11]
Anacrusis
Anadiplosis
AnagnorisisThe point in a plot where a character recognizes the true state of affairs[12]
Analects
AnalepsisAn interjected scene that takes the narrative back in time from the current point the story has reached[13]
Analogue
AnalogyComparison between two things that are otherwise unlike. H[14][15]
Anapesta version of the foot in poetry in which the first two syllables of a line are unstressed, followed by a stressed syllable. Ex. Intercept (the syllables in and ter are unstressed followed by cept which is stressed)[16]
Anaphora
Anastrophe
Anecdotea short account of a particular incident or event, especially of an interesting or amusing nature.[17]
Annal
Annotation
Antagonistthe adversary of the hero or protagonist of a drama or other literary work: Iago is the antagonist[18] of Othello.[18]
Antanaclasis
AntecedentA word or phrase referred to by any relative pronoun.[6]
Antepenult
Anthology
Anticlimax
Anti-hero
Anti-masque
Anti-romance
Antimetabole
Antinovel
Antistrophe
Antithesis
Antithetical couplet
Antonym
Aphorism
Apocope
Apollonian and Dionysian
Apologue
Apology
Apothegm
Aposiopesis
ApostropheA figure of speech in which the speaker addresses an object, concept, or person (usually absent) that is unable to respond.[6]
Apron stage
Arcadia
Archaism
Archetype
Aristeia
Argument
Arsis
Asemic writing
Aside
Assonance
Astrophicstanzas having no particular pattern.[2][8]
AsyndetonThe omission of conjunctions between clauses. An example is when John F. Kennedy said on January the 20th 1961 "...that we shall pay any price, bear any burden, meet any hardship, support any friend, oppose any foe to assure the survival and the success of liberty."[19]
Aube
Aubade
Audience
Autobiography
Autotelic
Avant-garde
Ballad
Ballade
Ballad stanza
Bard
Baroque
Bathos
Beast fable (beast epic)
Beast poetry
Beat Generation
Beginning rhyme
Belles-lettres
Bestiary
Beta reader
Bibliography
Bildungsroman
Biography
Blank verseVerse written in iambic pentameter without rhyme.[8][20]
Body
Bombast (fustian)
Boulevard theatre
Bourgeois drama
Bouts-Rimés
Breviloquence
Broadside
Burlesque
Burletta
Burns stanza
Buskin
Byronic hero
Cadence
Caesura
Calligram
Canon
Canso
Canticum
Canto
Canzone
Capa y espada
Captivity narrative
Caricature
Carmen figuratum
Carpe diem
Catachresis
Catalectic
Catalexis
Catastrophe
Catharsis
Caudate sonnet
Cavalier drama
Cavalier poetry
Celtic Renaissance
Celtic Revival
Celtic Twilight
Caesura
Chain of Being
Chain verse
Chanson de geste
Chansonnier
Chant royal
Chapbook
Character
Characterization
Charactonym
Chaucerian stanza
Chiasmus
Chivalric romance
Choriamb
Choriambus
Chorus
Chronicle
Chronicle play
Cinquain
Classicism
Classification (literature)
Clerihew
Cliché
Climax
Cloak-and-sword play
Close reading
Closed heroic couplet
Closet drama
Collaborative poetry
Colloquialism
Comédie larmoyante
Comedy
Comedy of errors
Comedy of humors
Comedy of intrigue
Comedy of manners
Comedic relief
Commedia dell'arte
Comic relief
Commedia erudita
Common measure
Commonplace book
Common rhyme
Comparative linguistics
Compensation
Complaint
Conceit
Concordance
Concrete universal
Confessional literature
Confidant/confidante
Conflict
Connotation
Consistency
Consonance
Contradiction
Context
Contrast
Convention
Counterplot
Coup de théâtre
CoupletTwo lines with rhyming ends. Shakespeare often used a couplet to end a sonnet.[8]
Courtesy book
Courtly love
Cowleyan ode
Cradle books
Craft cycle
Crisis
Criticism
Cross acrostic
Crown of sonnets
Curtain raiser
Curtal sonnet
Dactyl
Dada
Dandyism
Débat
Death poem
Death of the novel
Debut novel
Decadence
Decasyllabic verse
Decorum
Denotation
Dénouement
Dependent ClauseA group of words containing a subject and a verb, but does not equate to a complete thought.[6]
Description
Descriptive linguistics
Detective story
Deus ex machina
Deuteragonist
Dialect
DialogicA work primarily featuring dialogue; a piece of, relating to, or written in dialogue.[11]
Dialogue
Dibrach
DictionAlso known as "lexis" and "word choice," the term refers to the words selected for use in any oral, written, or literary expression. Diction often centers on opening a great array of lexical possibilities with the connotation of words by maintaining first the denotation of words.[21]
DidacticIntended to teach, instruct, or have a moral lesson for the reader.[11]
Digest
Digression
Dime novel
Diameter
DimeterA line of verse made up of two feet (two stresses).[9]
Dipody
Dirge
Discourse
Dissociation of sensibility
Dissonance
Distich
Distributed Stress
Dithyramb
Diverbium
Divine afflatus
Doggerel
Dolce stil nuove
Domestic tragedy
Donnée
Doppelgänger
Double
Double rhyme
Drama
Drama of sensibilityUsing ones senses as a medium for writing to relay emotion and the perception of sensations of oneself or of others and play upon those sensations to create a relatability stemming from the human condition.[6]
Dramatic character
Dramatic irony
Dramatic lyric
Dramatic monologue
Dramatic proverb
Dramatis personae
Dramaturgy
Dream allegory
Dream vision
Droll
Dumb show
Duodecimo
Duologue
Duple meter/duple rhythm
Dystopia
Dynamic Character
Echo verse
Eclogue
EkphrasisA vivid, graphic, or dramatic written commentary or description of another visual form of art.[2][8]
Elegiac couplet
Elegiac meter
Elegy
Elision
Emblem
Emblem book
Emendation
Emotive language
Encomiastic verse
End rhyme
End-stopped lineA line in poetry that ends in a pause—indicated by a specific punctuation, such as a period or a semicolon.[9]
English sonnet
EnjambmentThe continuing of a syntactic unit over the end of a line. Enjambment occurs when the sense of the line overflows the meter and line break.[2]
Entr'acte
Envoy/envoi
Epanalepsis
Épater la bourgeoisie
Epic poetryA long poem that narrates the victories and adventures of a hero. It can be identified by lofty or elegant diction.[8]
Epic simile
Epic Theater
Epigraph
Epilogue
Epiphany
Episode
Episteme
Epistle
Epistolary novel
Epistrophe
Epitaph
Epithalamion
Epithet
Epizeuxis
Epode
Eponymous author
Equivalence
Erotica
Erziehungsroman
Essay
Ethos
Eulogy
Euphony
Euphuism
Evidence
Exaggeration
Exegesis
Exemplum
Existentialism
Exordium
Experimental novel
Explication de texte
Exposition (literary technique)
Exposition (dramatic structure)
Expressionism
Extended metaphor
Extension
Extrametrical verse
Extravaganza
Eye rhyme
Fable
Fabliau
Falling action
Falling rhythm
Fancy and imagination
Fantasy
Farce
Feeling
Feminine ending
Feminine rhymeA rhyme with two syllables. One is stressed, one is unstressed. Examples: “Merry”, “Coffee”.[2][8]
Fiction
Figurative language
Figure of speech
Fin de siècle
FlashbackAn interjected scene that takes the narrative back in time from the current point the story has reached[13]
FlashforwardAn interjected scene that takes the narrative forward in time from the current point of the story in literature, film, television and other media[13]
Flat character
Foil
Folio
Folk drama
Folklore
Folk tale
Foot
Foreshadowing
Form
Fourteener
Frame story
Free indirect discourse
Free verse
French forms
Freytag's pyramid
Fustian
FutureExpresses a condition happening in the future by using shall, will, am, is, are and going to with a verb. Adverbs are also used with the present tense of the verb to show future tense.[2][8]
Futurism
Gallows humor
Gathering (literature)
Genetic fallacy
Genius and talent
Genre
Georgian poetry
Georgics
Gesta
Ghazal
Gloss
Gnomic verse
Golden line
Goliardic verse
Gongorism
Gonzo journalism
Gothic novel
Grand Guignol
Greek tragedy
Grub Street
Guignol
Gushi
Hagiography
Hagiology
HaibunProse written in a terse, haikai style, accompanied by haiku[22]
HaikaiBroad genre comprising the related forms haikuhaikai-renga and haibun[22]
HaikuModern term for standalone hokku[22]
Half rhyme
Hamartia
Handwaving
Headless line
Head rhyme
Hemistich
Hendecasyllable
Hendecasyllabic verse
Heptameter
Heptastich
Heresy of paraphrase
Heroic couplets
Heroic drama
Heroic quatrain
Heroic stanza
HexameterA line from a poem hat has six feet in its meter. Another name for hexameter is "The Alexandrine."[8]
Hexastich
Hiatus
High comedy
Higher criticism
Historical linguistics
Historic present
History play
HokkuIn Japanese poetry, the opening stanza of a renga or renku (haikai no renga)[23]
Holograph
Homeric epithet
Homily
Horatian ode
Horatian satire
Hornbook
Hovering accent
Hubris
Hudibrastic
Humor
Humours
Hybris
Hymn
Hymnal stanza
Hypallage
Hyperbatona figure of speech that alters the syntactic order of the words in a sentence or separates normally-associated words.The term may also be used more generally for all different figures of speech that transpose the natural word order in sentences.[24][25]
Hyperbole
Hypercatalectic
Hypermetrical
Hypocorism
Hysteron-proteron
HypotacticA term where different subordinate clauses are used in a sentence to qualify a single verb, or modify it.[8]
Iambic pentameter
Ideology
Idiom
Idyll
Imagery
Imagism
Impressionism
Incipit
Indeterminacy
Inference
In medias res
Innuendo
InterjectionA word that’s tacked onto a sentence in order to add strong emotion. It’s grammatically unrelated to the rest of the sentence. They are usually followed by an exclamation point.[8]
Internal conflict
Internal rhyme
Interpretation
IntertextualityRefers to the way in which different works of literature interact with and relate to one another in order to construct meaning.[8]
Intuitive description
Irony
Jacobean era
Jeremiad
Ji-amariThe use of one or more extra syllabic units (on) above the 5/7 standard in Japanese poetic forms such as waka and haiku.[26]
Jintishi
JitarazuThe use of fewer syllabic units (on) than the 5/7 standard in Japanese poetic forms such as waka and haiku.[27]
Judicial criticism
Jueju
Juggernaut
Juncture (literature)
Juvenalian satire
Juxtaposition
Kabuki
Kafkaesque
Katharsis
Kenning
KigoIn Japanese poetry, a seasonal word or phrase required in haiku and renku[28]
King's English
KirejiIn Japanese poetry, a "cutting word" required in haiku and hokku[29]
Kitsch
Künstlerroman
Lacunagap, hole, conspicuous absence
Lai
Lake Poets
Lament
Lampoon
L'art pour l'art
Laureate
Lay
Legend
Legitimate theater
Leonine rhyme
Lexis
Letters
Level stress (even accent)
Libretto
Light ending
Light poetry
Light rhyme
Light stress
Light poetry
Limerick
Linguistics
Linked rhyme
Link sonnet
Literary ballad
Literary criticism
Literary epic
Literary fauvism
Literary realism
Literary theory
Literature
Litotes
Litterateur
Liturgical drama
Living Newspaper
Local color[disambiguation needed]
Logaoedic
Logical fallacy
Logical stress
Logos
Long metre
Long poem
Loose sentence
Lost Generation
Low comedy
Lullaby
Lune
Lushi
LyricA short poem with a song-like quality, or designed to be set to music; often conveying feelings, emotions, or personal thoughts.[9]
Macaronic language
Madrigal (poetry)
Magic realism
Malapropism
Maqama
Märchen
Marginalia
Marinism
Marivauge
Marxist literary criticism
Masculine ending
Masculine rhyme
Masked comedy
Masque
Maxim
Meaning
Medieval drama
Meiosis
Melic poetry
MelodramaA work that is characterized by extravagant theatricality and by the predominance of plot and physical action over characterization[11]
Memoir
Menippean satire
Mesostic
MetaphorMaking a comparison between two unlike things without using the words like, as, or than.[9]
Metaphysical conceit
Metaphorical language
Meter
Metonymy
Metre
Metrical accent
Metrical foot
Metrical structure
Microcosm
Middle Comedy
Miles gloriosus
Miltonic sonnet
Mimesis
Minnesang
Minstrel
Mystery play (miracle play)
Miscellanies
Mise en scène
Mixed metaphor
Mock-heroic (mock epic)
Mode
Monodrama
Monody
Monogatari
Monograph
Monologue
Monometer (monopody)
Monostich
Monograph
Mood
Mora
Moral
Morality play
Motif
Motivation
Movement
Mummery
Muses

English Literature Dictionary & Glossary for students

 

Welcome to possibly the most comprehensive English Literature related dictionary on the internet for students

Choose the initial letter of the term you wish to visit and click on it.

 

Welcome to ITS Tutorial School's comprehensive source of definitions for terms related to English Literature . It covers a wide range of terms, concepts and theories related to English literature. A brief biography of many well known  authors has also been included.

Over 850 terms are defined. This dictionary is primarily aimed at supporting secondary/senior/high school and early tertiary students who are studying English literature or related subjects.

The definitions of terms and concepts that have been included are most of the major subject specific words that students will come across when studying English literature at senior high school. First year undergraduates may also find it a useful reference point for topic areas that they did not cover at secondary/senior/high school. All terms in this dictionary are cross referenced and linked for ease of use.

The resource is the fourth in a series of Dictionaries/Glossaries that ITS Tutorial School has been developing specifically aimed at providing a comprehensive source of subject specific definitions to help students and teachers everywhere. ITS Tutorial School is aiming to provide a content rich portal that will be of aid to both educators and students worldwide. All terms in this dictionary have been rewritten from a wide variety of sources with the emphasis being on precise definitions and explanations that students can use in their study. Term are cross linked with the linked term opening in a new page so that students can fully understand the definition or concept that is being explained.

ITS has spent a considerable amount of time in writing the dictionary and is copyright holder of this dictionary. Use is subject to the following:

You may print definitions for your own use as a student or teacher without ITS permission but I do ask that these print-outs give the URL as the source.

You may not copy any of these pages on to your own web-site, or any form of electronically accessible media.

Please email ITS if you would like to add a term to this dictionary / glossary. Either send us your definition or request that we define the term for you.

This resource was created to help students and others everywhere. ITS would like to freely encourage other internet sites to link to this dictionary.

Please just paste the following link text into your html source code:

<a href="http://www.itseducation.asia/english-literature/" target="_new">English Literature Dictionary / Glossary for Students</a>

It will look like this:
English Literature Dictionary / Glossary for Students

All terms in this dictionary are bookmarked and it is possible to place a link to any term that will then open the definition in a new page from your own site by using the following text. All that is needed is to change the b.htm to the correct dictionary letter page ie d.htm and the tem ie blank_verse to the term you wish to show the definition to i.e description.

<a target="_blank" href="http://www.itseducation.asia/english-literature/b.htm#blank_verse">blank verse</a>

It will look like this: blank verse

Any questions or comments [email protected]

A   B   C   D   E   F   G   H   I   J   K   L   M   N   O   P   Q   R   S   T   U   V   W  X   Y   Z

This dictionary is designed to be especially targeted at students studying the following courses and syllabuses:

United Kingdom (UK) AS & A2 (GCE) Level syllabuses from AQA, CIE, Edexcel and OCR exam boards
The IB (International Baccalaureate) English (both A1 and A2)
Hong Kong (HK) A Level and HKDSE Literature in English
Australian syllabuses including HSC, VCE and SACE
Introductory level courses in the United States for English literature related degrees
First year university or associate diploma level English literature related courses
Home schooling students

This resource was developed by:
The staff at ITS Tutorial School
The dictionary's content was edited by:

Maya Parmer
M.A Leeds - (English Literature)

and

Susan Smith
B.A., G.Dip.Ed.,G.Dip.App.Ling., M.Ed.
Director of Studies
ITS Tutorial School

 

 


A   B   C   D   E   F   G   H   I   J   K   L   M   N   O   P   Q   R   S   T   U   V   W  X   Y   Z

One thought on “Cover Letter Glossary Of Literary

Leave a comment

L'indirizzo email non verrà pubblicato. I campi obbligatori sono contrassegnati *